Highland Road Park Observatory

Calendar of Events 2017 - August

Friday, 4 August

7:30 pm to 8:30 pm: The Great Martian Opposition The countdown begins to 27 July 2018—when Mars♂ becomes the biggest and brightest in Earth♁’s sky it has been in fifteen years! This presentation provides an overview of the year-long apparition of Mars♂ which culminates in that glorious Friday night. [No admission fee. For ages fourteen and older.]
8:30 pm to 10:00 pm: Evening Sky Viewing Weather permitting, viewing through one or more telescopes will take place. During this time the the waxing gibbous Moon will be 93% illuminated at a maximum altitude of 37°. Please keep headlights off while parking and leaving, and drive slowly! [No admission fee. For all ages.]

Saturday, 5 August

10:00 am to 12:00 pm: Solar Safety With the upcoming Great American Eclipse on 21 August, Science Academy will illustrate to the Cadets why the Sun☉’s electromagnetism can permanently damage eyes, and how to view safely our parent star—during an eclipse or at any time! [For ages eight to twelve. $5.00 per in-parish Cadet; $6.00 per out-of-parish Cadet.]
8:30 pm to 10:00 pm: Planet Time: Saturn♄ Weather permitting, viewing through one or more telescopes will take place. During this time the waxing gibbous Moon will be 97% illuminated at a maximum altitude of 36°. The planet Saturn♄ will be the preferred target tonight. Please keep headlights off while parking and leaving, and drive slowly! [No admission fee. For all ages.]

Friday, 11 August

10:00 pm to 2:00 am: Perseid Meteor Shower The Perseids are one of the major meteor showers of the year, caused by debris left from the passings of Comet☄ Swift-Tuttle. Come learn about meteors and let’s see if we can spot some “earthgrazers.” Although telescopes aren’t needed for the Perseids, we’ll have a telescope available until midnight for leisurely gazing at other celestial objects. [No admission fee. For all ages.]

Saturday, 12 August

7:30 pm to 10:00 pm: Evening Sky Viewing Weather permitting, viewing through one or more telescopes will take place. During this time the waning gibbous Moon will be below the horizon. Please keep headlights off while parking and leaving, and drive slowly! [No admission fee. For all ages.]

Monday, 14 August

6:15 pm to 7:00 pm: Light Pollution Committee Meeting In conjunction with the 20/20 Vision Campaign, B.R.A.S. has initiated this open house and invites all skygazers, homeowners, business owners and other stakeholders in the night sky to participate. Visitors will receive preliminary information on Baton Rouge’s first-ever Natural Sky Conference to take place in November. [No admission fee. For ages eighteen and older.]
7:00 pm to 9:00 pm: Baton Rouge Astronomical Society Meeting For over thirty years B.R.A.S. has educated countless numbers of citizens in the joys of planetary and deep-sky gazing, the perils of light pollution and factors to consider when buying a pair of binoculars or a telescope. B.R.A.S. members have published in “Astronomy,” “Sky & Telescope,” and “Scientific American.” B.R.A.S. members have constructed their own telescopes and photographic platforms. B.R.A.S. members have entered robotics competitions, imaged comets, earned observing certificates and discovered asteroids. B.R.A.S. members have been interviewed by local media and the National Geographic Society. Anyone interested in learning more about B.R.A.S. is invited to attend. [Free admission. For ages for ages fourteen and older.]

Friday, 18 August

7:30 pm to 8:30 pm: The Brushy Creek Crater Paul Heinrich of LSU will discuss the investigation leading him and his colleagues to discover an actual impact crater just northeast of Baton Rouge! [No admission fee. For ages fourteen and older.]
8:30 pm to 10:00 pm: Evening Sky Viewing Weather permitting, viewing through one or more telescopes will take place. During this time the waning crescent Moon will be below the horizon. Please keep headlights off while parking and leaving, and drive slowly! [No admission fee. For all ages.]

Saturday, 19 August

10:00 am to 12:00 pm: Solar Eclipses We’re just two days from the Great American Eclipse. Cadets will learn the science behind solar eclipses and why they don’t occur more often. [For ages eight to twelve. $5.00 per in-parish Cadet; $6.00 per out-of-parish Cadet.]
7:00 pm to 10:00 pm: Evening Sky Viewing Plus Weather permitting, viewing through one or more telescopes will take place. Additionally, there will be a marshmallow roast, physical science demos and a sky tour. During this time the waning crescent will be below the horizon. Please keep headlights off while parking and leaving, and drive slowly! [No admission fee. For all ages.]

Monday, 21 August

11:00 am to 3:00 pm: Great American Eclipse Not since 1918 has a total solar eclipse crossed the United States from coast to coast. The path of totality will cut through Oregon, Idaho, Wyoming, Nebraska, Missouri, Kentucky, Tennessee and South Carolina. Not Louisiana, you say? It's true…but still a fine partial eclipse (weather permitting) will be seen in the local area. [No admission fee. For all ages.]

Friday, 25 August

7:30 pm to 8:30 pm: The Chinese Calendar Professor John Henderson returns for his informative presention of a lunisolar calendar traditionally used by hundreds of millions of people for centuries. [No admission fee. For ages fourteen and older.]
8:30 pm to 10:00 pm: Evening Sky Viewing Weather permitting, viewing through one or more telescopes will take place. During this time the the waxing crescent Moon will be 21% illuminated at a maximum altitude of 22°. Please keep headlights off while parking and leaving, and drive slowly! [No admission fee. For all ages.]

Saturday, 26 August

10:00 am to 12:00 pm: Mercury☿ The smallest planet is also the quickest and the hardest to spot in the sky. Cadets will delve into the mysteries of this elusive object! [For ages eight to twelve. $5.00 per in-parish Cadet; $6.00 per out-of-parish Cadet.]
12:00 pm to 2:00 pm: Solar Viewing Weather permitting, safe viewing of the Sun☉ in three different manners will occur. During this time the Sun☉ will be in the constellation Leo♌ at a maximum altitude of 70°. [No admission fee. For all ages. Solar viewers available for $2.00; limit four per adult purchaser.]
7:30 pm to 10:00 pm: Evening Sky Viewing Weather permitting, viewing through one or more telescopes will take place. During this time the waxing crescent will be 29% illuminated at a maximum altitude of 38°. Please keep headlights off while parking and leaving, and drive slowly! [No admission fee. For all ages.]

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Created by Frederick J. Barnett on Tuesday, August 1, 2017, 02:10 PM.